Our Local Community

Rivington lies to the north of Horwich and is reached from Lever Park Avenue. The River Douglas starts in Rivington, heading south through Wigan, marking the boundary between Horwich and Rivington. An early form of its name "Ruhwinton" could be derived from a rough farm steading, or "Rowenton", the settlement of the mountain ash. Bronze Age burial sites have been found on several hilltops, including Winter Hill. Above Rivington, are the Terraced Gardens, all that now remains of the former house and estate of Lord Leverhulme.

At the entrance to Lever Park Avenue, which leads into Rivington lane there is a pillar which reads: LEVER PARK, THE GIFT OF WILLIAM HESKETH LEVER 1ST VISCOUNT LEVERHULME BORN AT 6 WOOD STREET, BOLTON SEPTEMBER 19TH 1861. DIED AT HAMPSTEAD, LONDON MAY 7TH 1925.

The right hand pillar reads: FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CITIZENS OF HIS NATIVE TOWN AND NEIGHBOURHOOD BY ACT OF PARLIAMENT IN 1902 THE OWNERSHIP AND CARE OF THE PARISH WERE VESTED IN THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LIVERPOOL.

The actual act of parliament was passed on May 30th 1902 after a long battle which decided that Rivington Park could be a public park, but Liverpool Corporation, whose water it supplied, were to be responsible for it. Several mills were built to make use of the running water, handloom weaving and a number of farms established.  Liverpool Corporation Waterworks built filter beds on the site, and used the reservoir to supply drinking water from 1857.

Horwich is so fortunate to have the West Pennine Moors/Rivington on its doorstep providing a picturesque setting for outdoor pursuits like walking, cycling, fell running and water sports of all kinds. It also has an established fishery in the beautiful Wallsuches Conservation Area.

Middlebrook Retail and Leisure Park offers the delights of a cinema and bowling alley as well as the acclaimed Bolton Arena – a state-of-the-art sports and fitness centre, in addition to many retail outlets.

Horwich town centre is packed with restaurants of all kind serving a variety of cuisine and is also ‘dotted’ with cafes and pubs offering a wide choice to whet the appetite. Free parking is available.

There are thriving clubs and societies for sport, art, music and history. Summers are always bright in Horwich whatever the weather because of the colourful Carnival and a Races Day with cycle and running races for fun or serious competition. Horwich has Morris Men dancing around its streets and an annual Fell Race.

Swimming is available at the Leisure Centre that also has a fitness suite and provides for a variety of sports.

Horwich Resource Centre is home to many voluntary and community organisations as well as offering a wise choice of activity ranging from fun for tiny tots, to line dancing and karate and luncheon clubs for the elderly and vulnerable. Horwich Heritage Centre has wonderful displays and information about the rich history of the town and is free to enter.

For more information about everything you can do in Horwich visit www.horwich.gov.uk or request a FREE guide available from the Public Hall, Horwich Resource Centre, Horwich Library and Clinic and other outlets or contact the Town Clerk: townclerk@horwich.gov.uk. Tel: 01204 338900.    

Blackrod is a village of the metropolitan borough of Bolton in Greater Manchester. According to the United Kingdom Census 2001 Blackrod has a population of 5,300. Historically, a part of Lancashire, Blackrod was once a centre for coal mining. There is a legend that the Romans built a fort on the northern side of the town, on what is now a residential area called Castle Croft. The A6 road built along the course of a Roman road runs below the hill on which the town sits.